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Episode #14: What is it like working in Security? - Interview with an Artificial Cyber Intelligence

Updated: Apr 25

Episode #14: What is it like working in Security?

What is it like working in Security?

There are a thousand ways to get into the cyber security industry! We chat with an AI to explore the possible qualifications, jobs and career plans that could help you along the way!

 

Episode #14: What is it like working in Security?



What is it like working in Security?


Working in cyber security can be a challenging and rewarding experience. As a cyber security professional, you would be responsible for protecting an organization's network and systems from cyber attacks and breaches. This would involve identifying and analyzing potential security threats, implementing security measures to protect against those threats, and monitoring networks and systems to detect and respond to security incidents.


One of the main challenges in cyber security is that the field is constantly evolving, with new threats and attack methods emerging all the time. As a cyber security professional, you would need to stay up-to-date with the latest security trends and technologies, and be able to adapt quickly to new threats.


Another challenge is that cyber security is a complex field, requiring a wide range of skills and knowledge. A cyber security professional would need to have a solid understanding of various security protocols and technologies, as well as knowledge of computer networks, operating systems, and programming languages.


However, despite these challenges, working in cyber security can be a very rewarding experience. As a cyber security professional, you would be making a real difference in protecting an organization's critical assets, as well as its reputation and customers' trust. Additionally, the demand for cyber security professionals is high, and the field is expected to continue to grow in the future.


Overall, working in cyber security requires a strong commitment to learning and continuous improvement, as well as a passion for technology and a desire to help protect organizations and individuals from cyber threats.


 

Sounds interesting! I don't have any experience or education in cyber security. What is the best entry level cyber security job for someone like me?


It is possible to work in cyber security with no qualifications or relevant experience, but it may be challenging and the opportunities might be limited. Many cyber security jobs require a certain level of education and experience, such as a degree in computer science, engineering, or a related field, and/or relevant certifications.


However, there are some entry-level positions that may not require formal qualifications or experience. For example, some organizations may hire individuals for positions such as security operations center (SOC) analyst or security analyst that may not require a degree or certifications but may require some level of knowledge in IT and cyber security.


Additionally, you can start by gaining knowledge and experience in the field through self-study, online courses, and certifications. This will enable you to develop the necessary skills and knowledge to increase your chances of getting hired for entry-level positions in cyber security.


It's also worth noting that many organizations offer cyber security training and development programs for entry-level employees to help them develop the necessary skills for the job.


Therefore, while it may be more challenging to enter the field without qualifications or experience, it is not impossible. With the right approach, dedication, and willingness to learn, you can work your way into a cyber security career.


 

So, to be effective at a role within the cyber security field I should really focus on gaining knowledge and experience where I can? What are the best entry level qualifications or courses I can take if I'm looking to transition into the cyber security field?


Yes, gaining knowledge and experience is crucial if you're looking to transition into the cyber security field. There are many entry-level qualifications and courses that can help you develop the necessary skills and knowledge for a career in cyber security.


Here are a few examples of entry-level qualifications and courses that may be helpful for someone looking to transition into the cyber security field:


CompTIA Security+: This is a vendor-neutral certification that covers the basics of security, including network security, compliance and operational security, threats and vulnerabilities, and application, data and host security.


Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) - This certification is intended for individuals who want to learn the skills and techniques used by malicious hackers, and provides a foundation in the principles of hacking, penetration testing, and countermeasures.


SANS Institute: SANS Institute offers a variety of entry-level cyber security courses that cover topics such as security fundamentals, security management, and incident handling.


Online Courses: There are many online courses, such as those offered by Coursera, Udemy and edX, that provide an introduction to cyber security and the key concepts and technologies.


It's also worth noting that many universities and colleges offer cyber security courses, some of which are designed specifically for those without a background in the field. These can be a great way to gain a deeper understanding of the field, and to learn from experienced professionals.


Ultimately, the best entry-level qualifications or courses for you will depend on your background, interests, and career goals.


 

I want to manage a cyber security team in a large enterprise one day. Can you develop a career and education plan that I could use as a guide over the next 10 years to help me reach my career and knowledge goal?


Sure, here's an example of a career and education plan that you could use as a guide to help you reach your goal of managing a cyber security team in a large enterprise within the next 10 years:


Year 1-2: Start by gaining a strong understanding of the basics of IT and cyber security by taking entry-level courses such as CompTIA Security+ or SANS Institute's Security Essentials Bootcamp Style. These courses will provide you with a foundation in the principles of information security, including security management, operations, and different types of attacks.


Year 3-4: Consider getting a degree in computer science, engineering, or a related field. This will help you develop a deeper understanding of the technical aspects of IT and cyber security, and provide you with a competitive edge when applying for jobs in the field.


Year 5-6: Gain hands-on experience by working in an entry-level position such as a security analyst, security engineer, or penetration tester. This will provide you with the opportunity to apply your knowledge and skills in a real-world setting, and develop your ability to identify and respond to security threats.


Year 7-8: Consider getting certified such as Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) or Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) to demonstrate your knowledge and skills across a wide variety of security domains within the field.


Year 9-10: Aim for a leadership role within your current organization or look for an opportunity to manage a cyber security team in a large enterprise. This will give you the opportunity to lead and mentor other cyber security professionals, and make strategic decisions to protect your organization from cyber attacks.


It's important to note that this is just an example of a career and education plan and your actual experience may vary depending on your current qualifications, your learning pace and the job market. Additionally, it's important to stay up to date with the latest technologies and trends in the field. As the field is constantly evolving, you'll need to be proactive in your learning and development to ensure that you are equipped with the latest knowledge and skills.


 

You mentioned ‘security domains’ within the cyber security field when talking about the CISM certification. Can you explain what these domains are?


Sure, the Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) is a professional certification offered by ISACA (Information Systems Audit and Control Association) that recognizes individuals who have the knowledge and experience to develop and manage an enterprise's information security program.


CISM certification is specifically designed for individuals who have experience in information security management and it covers the following domains:


Information security governance: This domain covers the management and oversight of information security, including the development and maintenance of policies, standards, and procedures.


Information risk management and compliance: This domain covers the identification, assessment, and management of information security risks, as well as compliance with relevant laws, regulations, and standards.


Information security incident management: This domain covers the management of security incidents, including incident response, forensic analysis, and reporting.


Information security program development and management: This domain covers the development and management of an enterprise's information security program, including the identification of security controls, the development of security plans, and the management of security personnel.


CISM certification is well-regarded in the industry and it can be a great way to demonstrate your knowledge and skills in information security management. It can be beneficial for those who are looking to move into management roles in the cyber security field and it can also help to enhance your credibility as a cyber security professional.


 

Interesting! So, a good way to build towards my career goal may involve looking for roles within each of those four domains to gain some experience. What jobs would be good to gain experience in each domain?


Yes, gaining experience in each of the four domains covered by the CISM certification can be a good way to build towards your career goal of managing a cyber security team in a large enterprise. Here are some examples of jobs that can help you gain experience in each of the four domains:


Information security governance: Jobs in this domain might include roles such as a security analyst, security architect, or security consultant. These roles typically involve developing and maintaining security policies and procedures, and ensuring compliance with relevant laws and regulations.


Information risk management and compliance: Jobs in this domain might include roles such as a risk analyst or compliance analyst. These roles typically involve identifying and assessing security risks, and developing and implementing controls to mitigate those risks.


Information security incident management: Jobs in this domain might include roles such as a security operations center (SOC) analyst or incident responder. These roles typically involve monitoring for security incidents, analyzing and responding to incidents, and performing forensic investigations.


Information security program development and management: Jobs in this domain might include roles such as a security manager or chief information security officer (CISO). These roles typically involve developing and managing an organization's overall security program, including the identification of security controls, the development of security plans, and the management of security personnel.


It's important to note that the specific roles and titles may vary depending on the organization and the industry, but this should give you an idea of what types of jobs may align with the domains of CISM certification. Additionally, having a good understanding of the cyber security frameworks such as ISO 27001, NIST, COBIT, and PCI-DSS will be very beneficial.


 

Can you write a bed time story explaining the journey someone took to transition into the cyber security industry?


Once upon a time, there was a young person named Jack. Jack had always been fascinated by the world of technology and had a passion for understanding how things worked. However, Jack had never considered a career in the field of cyber security, as he didn’t know much about it.


One day, while browsing the internet, Jack came across an article about the importance of cyber security. The more he read, the more he realized that this was the field he wanted to pursue. He knew that he had to start learning more about cyber security if he wanted to make a career in this field.


So, Jack began his journey. He started reading articles and books about cyber security, attending webinars and participating in online courses. He learned about the different types of cyber threats and how to protect against them. He also learned about the different cyber security frameworks like ISO 27001, NIST, COBIT, and PCI-DSS.


As Jack learned more about the field, he began to see how important it was to the world and how much of an impact a career in cyber security could have. He knew that he had to gain hands-on experience if he wanted to make a real difference.


So, Jack began to look for opportunities to gain practical experience. He applied for internships and entry-level positions in cyber security. After some time, he landed an internship as a security analyst, where he got to apply the knowledge he had gained in a real-world setting.


During his internship, Jack worked hard and learned a lot. He quickly became an expert in his field and was eventually offered a full-time position as a security analyst. He was thrilled and accepted the offer.


Years passed and Jack continued to learn and grow. He gained more experience and eventually was promoted to lead a team of security analysts. Jack's hard work and dedication to his field had paid off. But this was just the beginning…

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